Museums and climate change – 5 free videos to help you take action

Video #1 – Brief overview of the climate challenge and a few simple steps that citizens – individuals, families, and communities – can take to get started.  Courtesy Alberta Museums Association. Free Download Here 3:13 min.

The Alberta Museums Association (AMA) in partnership with the Coalition of Museums for Climate Justice and Shadow Light Productions, is excited to announce the launch of a new video series, Taking Action Against Climate Change. These five videos – which debuted at the AMA’s 2018 Conference Cultivating Connections: Museums and the Environment – will help museums to raise awareness of this vital issue and will support the global museum community in taking an active role in the fight against climate change.

Video #2 – Brief overview of accelerated rate of climate change resulting in melting glaciers, lowered water flow in rivers, and the impact this has on food production. Suggests actions citizens need to take to slow down climate change. Free download here. 2:58 minutes

The series, along with Museums and the Climate Challenge video, released in April 2018, are funded in part by the Government of Alberta and will provide resources for museums as they embrace their role as agents of change in society. All are available for free download here.

Video #3 – Overview of accelerated rate of climate change due to human greenhouse gas emissions with resulting extreme weather conditions like hurricanes and tornadoes leading to sea rise, coastal flooding, food crises. Examples from “transition movement” with strategies for citizens to reduce carbon emissions & reduce fossil fuel use. Free download here. 2:51 minutes

Containing practical examples of how individuals can take proactive action to address climate issues, the five videos are intended to be shared across multiple platforms by the Alberta museum community and beyond. The videos are hopeful and engaging, and demonstrate not only what museums are doing to mitigate their carbon footprints but also how individuals and other institutions can, by making sustainable choices, affect real change to address this global problem.

Brief overview of impact of carbon emissions on the environment and all living things leading to rise in numbers of extinctions. Suggests starting community groups with local institutions like museums to address issues. Free download here. 2:30 min.

Museums are key civic resources in promoting public conversations about our collective well-being. The Coalition of Museums for Climate Justice is honoured to partner with the Alberta Museums Association and Shadow Light Productions to produce these videos, all of which are intended to broaden and deepen public engagement in climate change awareness and community resilience.

Dr. Robert R. Janes, Founder and Co-Chair, Coalition of Museums for Climate Justice
Museum workers talk about how they are taking climate action, both as individuals and within their institutions. Free download here 5:56 min

These five new videos continue the dialogue that began with our first video: Museums and the Climate Challenge. They demonstrate how museums continue to facilitate and lead conversations around issues that are important to their communities and find innovative and inclusive solutions that impact the future of our communities. We hope they will be widely distributed, and inspire people to take action now to combat climate change and build a more sustainable future.

Meaghan Patterson, AMA Executive Director / CEO

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